Mayor Kicks Off MEMS Fund Drive

Mayor Kicks Off MEMS Fund Drive

Posted on June 8, 2018

Montgomery Mayor Mark Conforti recently paid a personal visit to Montgomery Emergency Medical Services (MEMS) headquarters on Harlingen Road to recognize the launch of the volunteer squad’s 2018 fund drive, which runs through the summer.  During his visit, Mayor Conforti graciously delivered the very first donation to the annual fundraising effort.

The donation, just as those that have since followed, was gratefully received by the all-volunteer organization, which relies on community support for the bulk of its operating costs.

“The EMS squad is so important to Montgomery’s public health and safety,” said Mayor Conforti.  “Montgomery has grown quite a bit in over four decades since the EMS Squad building was constructed and the space is very tight.  There are new expenses this year as MEMS looks into updating and expanding the facility in an affordable and fiscally responsible manner.  MEMS’s annual operating budget is about $170,000, which is mostly paid for through donations.  If the town had to take over EMS services, it would cost the taxpayers of Montgomery well over $1 million. We are very fortunate to have their professional emergency services and I hope all residents will support them!”

MEMS President Scott DellaPeruta thanked Mayor Conforti for the donation, adding that, “Truly, we exist only because of the generosity of each individual community member.  Although most residents are aware that MEMS never charges for services, many are surprised to learn that we are run entirely as a charity.”

In addition to providing prompt and professional emergency care and transportation, MEMS plays several other vital roles in our community:

  • MEMS members respond to over 1,400 9-1-1 medical emergency calls each year in the township, providing Basic Life Support emergency medical care at no charge to patients.
  • MEMS provides standby services at community events and sports competitions. Our volunteers give additional time to serve as emergency medical staff at these events.
  • The MEMS EMT Cadet program provides medical and leadership training and experience to local teens. Many participants in the two-year program advance to medical careers and/or lifelong volunteer service.
  • Less visibly, when a storm is brewing, MEMS volunteers gather into response teams while most residents are advised to stay home and safe.
  • The organization also contributes to public health and safety by providing community CPR training and sponsoring community blood drives on a regular basis.

MEMS adult and young Cadet members donated over 36,000 hours of their time last year to the above activities alone.  The annual fund drive provides members with the annual operating budget needed for medical and office supplies, ongoing crew training, and building and equipment maintenance.

For more information, visit http://mems47.org on the web.

Source: MEMS